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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Midwifery Means Serving My Community

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Your Antenatal Care

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All orders within the UK qualify for free standard tracked delivery. Thank you for understanding. Many women and their families are concerned about how the strain on the NHS and the advice to socially distance themselves will affect their care during pregnancy. Whereas it is not possible to predict what impact COVID will have on staffing and provision on a national level and what measures individual Trusts will take to work through this crisis, we do know that care for pregnant women will remain a priority.

The antenatal care-pathway the schedule of appointments and content during pregnancy is very similar throughout the United Kingdom and the timing of most routine appointments during the first half, or a little more, of your pregnancy can be relatively flexible without compromising your care.

The following overview aims to offer you some information and reassurance about possible changes to your antenatal care. This is typically your first contact with your community midwife and it can take place any time after your 5 th week of pregnancy.

Having your booking appointment later than 10 week gestation could affect your screening choices , as certain tests are time-specific. So, if you find that your booking appointment has been cancelled or postponed, or you have to self-isolate, you are likely to have a wide margin of flexibility to rearrange it. If you are already over 11 weeks pregnant, however, an inevitable re-scheduling of your booking appointment may mean that your dating scan will occur later, possibly affecting your choices to have screening for certain chromosomal syndromes.

Being seen after your 10th week of pregnancy, may also mean you miss out on the optimal timing to have screening for certain inherited blood disorders and certain infectious diseases. However, although early detection of these is ideal, you can still be screened for them at any time during your pregnancy. Many Trusts are using telephone or online services instead of face-to-face encounters for those appointments that allow it.

It may be that part of your booking appointment can be completed this way, whilst tests and observations are performed at a different time.

In this follow-up appointment, your midwife usually reviews and relays to you results from any blood tests, scans and screening tests you may have chosen to have, ensures you have a date for your anomaly scan if you want one, refers you to the health visitor who, if you want, will meet you a few weeks before your due date , discusses options for antenatal classes in your area and generally checks how you are doing.

All of the above can either be done over the telephone or delayed, if necessary. Some Trusts will offer further screening at this appointment if blood tests showed your blood type to be Rhesus negative. However, if your Trust does not offer this, you will be given the option to have preventative treatment to reduce the risk of Rhesus disease.

If there was a need to postpone this appointment, your blood pressure, urine testing and any further blood tests could wait. Routinely, you would be seen again in the community between weeks if you are pregnant with your first baby or, in some cases, if your history deems it necessary. First time mums or women with a history of pre-eclampsia in a previous pregnancy are recommended to have their blood pressure and urine checked around this time.

If postponing of this appointment cannot be helped, a midwife should ideally conduct a telephone assessment and, if there are no concerns, book you in to have you blood pressure and urine checked. If you were not seen between weeks or have not had a SFH measurement, it may be particularly important to not delay this appointment by much.

As with the week appointment, only first-time mums or women whose blood pressure needs to be monitored more closely, will be offered to be seen at 31 weeks. Appointments from your 34 th week of pregnancy until your baby is born. Delaying any of these appointments by a few days is unlikely to adversely affect your wellbeing or that of your unborn baby.

However, your care provider should be making plans for you to be seen as soon as possible if one of them are cancelled or postponed. This may mean not having all your care provided in one go. Essential scans should still take place as necessary, but other scans and hospital appointments may need to be re-scheduled.

In this time of crisis, pulling together and accepting that things will be different will prove essential in preserving our mental health and supporting our care providers. Yet, your wellbeing during your pregnancy remains a priority and we would urge you to continue to contact your maternity unit or named midwife if you have any concerns about yours or your baby's wellbeing. New Mum. Choices in Maternity Care During Pregnancy. Mental health in pregnancy.

Coping with a newborn in isolation. Booking appointment This is typically your first contact with your community midwife and it can take place any time after your 5 th week of pregnancy. Follow-up at weeks Routinely, you would be seen again in the community between weeks if you are pregnant with your first baby or, in some cases, if your history deems it necessary. Summary In this time of crisis, pulling together and accepting that things will be different will prove essential in preserving our mental health and supporting our care providers.

Your booking appointment

Pregnant women are being encouraged to contact their local community midwife as soon as they know they are pregnant. The campaign aims to encourage mums-to-be to contact their midwife as a first point of contact to access advice and antenatal care more quickly to help ensure a healthy pregnancy. By calling , women can choose to speak to a local midwife as soon as they know they are pregnant. Midwives are highly visible health professionals within the community.

Catching Babies is a moving account of an extraordinary career. It reveals the unique experiences that filled midwife Sheena Byrom's days as she looked after mums and dads and helped to bring their precious babies into the world. From her very first day as a nervous student nurse in Blackburn to the dedicated completion of her midwifery qualifications in Burnley, Sheena has never once looked back, enjoying a thirty-five-year career with the NHS.

A midwife is a health professional male or female who supports women through pregnancy, labour, birth and the early days of parenthood MIDIRS, They will see you through scans, tests and welcoming your baby into the world. Community midwives will monitor you during your pregnancy, give advice and arrange access to any medical care you need. For the birth, a hospital midwife will support and guide you and help you to get medical support if you need it.

Antenatal appointments schedule

All orders within the UK qualify for free standard tracked delivery. Thank you for understanding. Many women and their families are concerned about how the strain on the NHS and the advice to socially distance themselves will affect their care during pregnancy. Whereas it is not possible to predict what impact COVID will have on staffing and provision on a national level and what measures individual Trusts will take to work through this crisis, we do know that care for pregnant women will remain a priority. The antenatal care-pathway the schedule of appointments and content during pregnancy is very similar throughout the United Kingdom and the timing of most routine appointments during the first half, or a little more, of your pregnancy can be relatively flexible without compromising your care. The following overview aims to offer you some information and reassurance about possible changes to your antenatal care. This is typically your first contact with your community midwife and it can take place any time after your 5 th week of pregnancy.

Direct To Midwife

Agnes Light trained as a nurse in the s and went on to become a midwife - helping to bring new lives into the world for over thirty years. After fainting from shock at the first birth she attended as a student, Agnes grew to adore her job and the lifelong friends that worked with her on the maternity ward. In her enchanting memoir, she recalls how she struggled at first with the strict rules of hospital etiquette, and the expectation that she would always know the right thing to do - from dealing with hysterical fathers to miracle multiple births - Agnes quickly learnt she had to keep a cool head whatever the circumstances. This is a heartwarming portrait of a thoughtful and compassionate midwife.

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Having a baby is a life-changing event that is different for everyone. It is important to get the right care for you and your baby. That means arranging referral to an antenatal clinic as soon as possible after you discover you're pregnant. And our pregnancy hub has a host of information on every aspect of your pregnancy.

Refer Yourself for NHS Antenatal Care

If there are no problems with your pregnancy, you'll probably see midwives for most of your care. You might not see the same person for all your antenatal appointments. You'll probably see midwives most of the time, but in some areas your local doctor may do some antenatal appointments, or you may see a hospital doctor for one or more. You will be offered at least two ultrasound scans during your pregnancy.

Skip to content. During your pregnancy you will usually have between seven and ten antenatal appointments depending on whether it is your first pregnancy. Women with complicated pregnancies or who are expecting multiple babies may need additional appointments. Guidance for pregnant women and information on what is happening in their regional unit during the coronavirus COVID outbreak can be found on NI Maternity. Each antenatal appointment should have a specific purpose as well as an opportunity for you to discuss any concerns or ask any questions you might have. You should bring a fresh urine sample to each appointment.

Pregnant during the COVID-19 pandemic – what happens to my antenatal care?

Follow the national advice and stay at home for seven days. Important information about our services and restrictions on visiting our hospitals can be found in the COVID section. This site is best viewed with a modern browser. You appear to be using an old version of Internet Explorer. We would like to answer your questions about arrangements we have made to ensure that you continue to be supported and cared for safely through pregnancy, birth and the period afterwards.

Do I have to see my GP for a referral to a midwife? After your baby is born, a community midwife will be around to help you feed and care for your baby. That is.

Midwifery: Best Practice Volume 5. Sara Wickham. This is Volume 5 in the Midwifery: Best Practice series. These are different in each volume and reflect a wide range of key and topical issues within midwifery.

Your antenatal appointment schedule

To find out what to do if you think you have symptoms, please visit Coronavirus symptom checker. Or visit our encyclopaedia page , which has general information and includes a BSL video. Find maternity units in your area.

First midwife appointment

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Your first main appointment is your booking appointment booking visit with your midwife normally between 8 and 12 weeks of pregnancy. You'll have your weight, height and blood pressure measured.

Back to Your pregnancy and baby guide. You'll be offered appointments with a midwife, or sometimes a doctor who specialises in pregnancy and birth an obstetrician. You should start your antenatal care as soon as possible once you know you're pregnant. You can do this by contacting a midwife or GP.

Antenatal appointments scheduler

The browser you are using is too old for our website. Please visit www. Your first midwife appointment is an exciting moment. You are unlikely to be cared for by the same midwife throughout your whole pregnancy and often women see a team of midwives for their antenatal appointments. Your first appointment is an opportunity to ask questions and raise any concerns you might have.

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